List of Travelling Places

  • Kaziranga National Park

    Kaziranga National Park lies on the south bank of the Brahamaputra and its boundary for the most part follows the Mora Diphlu river and runs parallel to National Highway No. 37. It covers an area of 688 sq. kilometres. The Park was first established in 1908, as a reserve forest with only abouta dozen rhinos and was declared a National Park in 1974. Kaziranga is famous for the great One-Horned Rhinos.

  • Manas National Park

    Manas is situated in Assam spread over an area of 391 sq km, earlier it was known as North Kamrup, declared as a sanctuary on December 01, 1928. It was accorded the status of World Heritage Site in 1985. Manas houses 19 of India's most endangered animal populations. It has the largest population of tigers among Indian reserves. It is a home to the rare golden langur . The prominent fauna here are the rhino, wild buffalos, elephants, gaur, swamp deer, capped langur and clouded leopard.

  • Kamakhya Temple

    Guwahati's best known temple is Kamakhya Temple on Nilachal Hill, eight km west of the city. These temples honour the Mother Goddess Kamakhya, the essence of female energy . Kamakhya is one of the 51 Hindu 'Pithas' where as per the mythology the genital organ of the Sati (Parvati) - the eternal wife of Lord Shiva - had fallen down after death in one of her incarnations. It is considered as one of the most important centres of Shakti worship and Tantric Hinduism. The Temple was rebuilt in 1665 after being destroyed by Muslim invaders, but its origins are much older than that. It was probably an ancient Khasi sacrificial site, sacrifices are still very much part of worshipping here. Group of devotees arrive each morning with goats to offer to Shakti. It attracts pilgrims from all over India , especially during the Ambuchi Festivals which usually falls around July. This is a celebration of the end of the earth's menstrual cycle.

  • Cherrapunji

    High above the hazy valleys and foaming rivers, hidden in the rolling clouds and perched on an headland, lies Cherrapunji, 4,500 ft above the sea level. Cherrapunji in the north eastern state of Meghalaya is a spectacular location with the year-round rain. Long ago, Cherrapunji in Meghalaya had earned the coveted place in the Guinness Book of World for being the wettest place on the earth. This is one place all over the world, where the rainfall can be recorded in feet rather than in millimeters. Cherrapunji , the pristine land with ever-lasting beauty, is perhaps the only place in India, which has just one season - the monsoon. The rainfall varies from heavy to medium to light, but there is no month without rain. Another surprising fact about Cherrapunji Meghalaya is that, it rains mostly at night. Day-to-day activity does not really get disrupted by the rain.

  • Golf course, Shillong

    Shillong has one of the largest golf courses (the world's wettest) in Asia and the golf course is called Gleneagles of the East. It enjoys the rare distinction of being one of the few natural golf courses in Asia. Not only is the Shillong golf course scenic and enjoyable, it is also challenging. A group of British Civil Service officers introduced golf to Shillong in 1898 by constructing a nine hole course. The present 18 hole course was inaugurated in 1924. The course is set in an undulating valley covered with pine and rhododendron trees. The tight fairways, carpeted with a unique local grass which hardens the soil, are difficult to negotiate. The number of out-of-bounds streams that criss-cross every fairway makes it all the more trying. Obstructions come in the form of bunkers, trees and rain. The longest hole is the 6th, which is a gruelling 594 yards.

  • Shillong Peak

    An ideal picnic spot, 10 km. from the city, 1965 m above sea level, offers a panoramic view of the scenic country side, and is also the highest point in the State. Obeisance is paid to U Shulong at the sanctum sanctorum at the peak's summit every springtime, by the religious priest of Mylliem State. In the evening the city lights below appear like a star-studded abyss.